The 10X Rule: Summary & Review

the 10x rule book cover

In the “10X Rule” Grant Cardone coins the “10X rule” of success, which says that in order to be successful you need to multiply your goals, actions, and consistency by an order of 10.

Bullet Summary

  • 10X your goals
  • 10X your actions
  • 10X your consistency

10X Summary

Grant says success rests on three beliefs’ pillars.

You must believe that:

  1. Success is important
  2. It’s your duty to be successful
  3. There’s an abundance of success possibilities

And he adds that you need a mindset of Extreme Ownership, meaning that whatever happens in your life is your responsibility.

Nothing happens to you. Everything happens because of you

Ethics of Success: Win-Win & Responsibility

Grant embraces the “enlightened cynic” view of life and success.

He says that the world is not a zero-sum game, and because you win, it doesn’t mean someone else has to lose. You both can win.

Most of all I liked his take on success:

You should consider it unethical not to live up to your potential.

And now let’s see what exactly you should 10X:

10X Your Thinking

Cardone says that humans tend to underestimate their capabilities.

And since not maximizing your potential is the ultimate sin, you need to counter-balance that natural “underestimation bias”.

Hence, to avoid leaving any potential on the table, multiply your goal by 10 times. Huge goals will motivate you and force you to come up with creative thinking to achieve them.

Are you worried that huge goals will set you up to lose? That’s not an issue. Grant says it feels much better to fall short of a lofty goal than to fall short on a mediocre one.

10X Your Effort

Achieving your goals probably takes 10x what you think it takes.

So start by multiplying your estimate by 10. If it will take less, great, you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

10X Your Action

Most people live in a limbo between no action and average action.

To reach your full potential though, you need massive action.
Cardone says that massive action takes actually no more effort than average action.

That is because people who take average action busy themselves with excuses, busy work, and playtime.
Massive action zeros in on your goals (your “One Thing”), and doesn’t stop until you get there.

10X Your Consistency

Action is great, but bursts of action may not be enough.

What really gets you to success is the consistency of that action over time.
It’s a message similar to what books such as “The Slight edge” and “The Compound Effect” also espouse. Both books also state that it’s only consistent effort that will add up over time to major success.

Consistency has also been explored by actual psychologists and researchers, and many agree that it’s indeed a key contributor to success.
For example, Angela Duckworth coined the term “Grit” and, in what frankly seems a bit of a “psychology in search of fame” claim, says that it matters more than innate talent (also see “pop psychology myths“).

10X Your “Fear Resilience

Everyone who seeks success must contend with some fears.

Cardone says that fear doesn’t act alone, and that the biggest ally fear has is… Time.
Such as, the more time you spend pondering over what could go wrong, the more fear increases.

Successful people use fear instead as an indicator for action.

Such as, whenever you feel fear, you want to take immediate action.
Cardone’s message here is similar to Mel Robbins’ “5 Seconds Rule“, and what the early pick-up artists called the “3 seconds rule”.

the 10x rule book cover

CONS

The Power Moves criticism of “The 10X Rule” includes:

Could Be Briefer: A Blog Post, Rather Than A Book

Cardone applies the “10X rule” across several domains of work, mindsets, and personal success.
Yet, albeit those concepts can be enlightening for some, they’re also relatively simple and may be summarized in a blog post.

No How To Book

The book is useful to instill some work ethics and a “dream big mindset”. However, it doesn’t go into details of either how one can install that mindset, or how to actually do anything that would make one successful.

Hard Work Alone Not Enough: Working Smart Matters

Hard work is important.
All else being equal, the person who works hardest will achieve more success.
However, good strategic -or even Machiavellian– thinking are also important. Such as, work hard yes, dream big.. But also work smart.

Hard Work Can Burn You Out

For a period in the self-help space there was a trend of hyping up hard work.

Someone referred to it as “hustle culture” or “porn hustle”, with Gary Vaynerchuck being one of the most ardent supporters.

I think it’s an important caveat to make that success is often built in the long run. You cannot -and probably should not- sprint the whole time.

As Ray Dalio says, you can look at yourself like a machine.
Machines need good keep up and care as well.

PROS

Some Interesting, Potentially Helpful Concept

The concept of going for bigger goals is the same as the “moonshot” of Peter Diamandis in Bold and the popular self-help book “The Magic of Thinking Big“.

And while many entrepreneurs and narcissists do not need that reminder, many people do need to hear that.
It’s also very useful to help you not leave any potential on the table, since you may fall short of your 10Xed goal, but you will most likely maximize your potential in the process.

10X Review

The 10X Rule has the typical Grant Cardone style: loud, and somewhat repetitive.

We gotta be honest and preface it by saying that we’re not the biggest fans of Grant Cardone.
And he didn’t look too good after his spat with Jordan Belfort, the author of “Straight Line Persuasion“.

However, we’re not saying that one cannot learn from the guy -or like him-.
And if you like Cardone and his exuberant style, you will like the 10X book.
But If Cardone he’s too over the top for you, then you can take a look at our best books list, and our full free book summaries repository.

Overall the 10X Rule is easy to read and tackles some very mindsets for success.
Most of all, we liked the concept that maximizing your potential is your ethical duty.

Read more summaries here or get the book on Amazon.

Processing...