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Leadership: how to enhance group cohesion? Shared goals VS pep talks

Hi Lucio, I've couple questions about leadership.

If a group has cohesion, its members are connected or united. In practice, what methods can we use to enhance cohesion ?

Some of my methods are: motivational speeches, shared goal.

I found that interpersonal relationships involve an exchange of value such as emotion, resource etc.  Is the leader the person who provides the most value in the group?  What are the necessary values a leader should provide compared to others ?

 

 

Hey mate,

That will depend on the type of group, for sure.

For hate groups for example, provide enemies, demonize and dehumanize that enemy, and be an extremist.
Enemies are your friends in hate groups, and moderates who build bridges (ie: the good guys) are your true enemies.

Recently I've done an analysis on The Red Pill, and that functions sometimes as an extremist/hate group.

That being said, hopefully you're not interested in leading a hate group :).

There is already a very in-depth article here on leadership, based on sound socio-psychological principles.
Check that out:

And in the course there is one lesson specific for managers, as many guys who take the course seek an edge on the workplace.
Management intersects with leadership, of course, but has a few peculiarities of its own.

Shared Goals VS Motivational Speeches

To answer your question specifically, shared goals are great.

But I'm not convinced about motivational speeches on an already formed group. People who already like you and are into motivational speeches will see you even more as an authority and as a "guru".

But the more skeptical and practical ones might think you are wasting time on hot air instead of focusing on real issues.

Motivational speeches work great for self-help gurus because people self-select as their followers.
But if you already have a fixed group, you are bound to have some who don't appreciate the pep-talk thing, and you would end up estranging those.

In short: "motivational speeches" are a mild form of "authority power plays".
Very powerful if people buy into it, but it backfires if people don't like leaders who lecture others on a soapbox.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

P.S.: I'm moving this from "Social Power" to the public forum to keep the private forum focused on the course.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

Thanks Lucio, that's really help me a lot. Respect

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

Very relevant to me as a team lead.  What are some moves other than speechifying or social events you can do to help the group to bind together?

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood

Hello T.,

Have you checked the leadership articles / lessons already?

Many of them have to do with group identity, things such as:

  • How we are different as a team
  • How we are good / why we are good

As well as improving the team cooperation:

  • Increasing team cooperation and support, then:
    • Framing the team as cohesive and supportive (these 2 are both parts of the general "increase scope for cooperation" strategy for power)
  • Setting the example: you be the first to support and encourage team members

And team morale:

  • Pull people up
  • Provide a general supportive and happy atmosphere
  • Celebrate successes
Transitioned has reacted to this post.
Transitioned
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

Yes some of this is sounding very familiar.  Time to go read that PU chapter again.   I think I need to work on this one:

  • Setting the example: you be the first to support and encourage team members

I do sometimes but the consistency isn't there yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had.  Its the area I find hardest to practice and internalise.

The celebrate success I need to work on.  I do it for the obvious wins.  But need to get better at cheerleading at the cross team events.

 

 

 

 

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
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