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Principles at Work

Hello guys,

same idea as the other threads: we can collect the principles that we learned that worked for us at work. Even though there is already a "Strategies (proven)" container, I feel we can keep a shorter format and keep new threads here for deeper topics.

Don't complain

So many people complain at work: about the hours, about the organization, the pay, the colleagues, their spouse, the economy, the Coronavirus, and so on and so forth.

It's normal to complain once in a while, it's human. And we can also bond through our challenges. But that must come rarely otherwise we become the infamous "Complainer" from the sub-category of value-takers.

So just by not complaining, we stop injecting negativity in the work place.

If I would be fair, I should have written: "Complain as little as possible". But it's better to shoot for the stars and reach the moon.

Don't gossip

Same principle as above. Important to avoid gossipers and not be one.

Cheers!

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

Give a notice to your supervisor when you completed a task

If you're an employee, when your manager or supervisor gives you a task, he (masculine for simplicity) also have a mental anchor about this task. When you finish the task, you get a dopamine hit for its completion. Good. Now when you tell your supervisor you finished the task:

  1. It allows him to get rid of the mental anchor: it's just being courteous, otherwise they have a loop that stays in their minds.
  2. It gives him a dopamine boost: he associates pleasure with you.
  3. It's part of closing the loop on this task: it's about being a good teamplayer.
  4. By being a good follower, you create the opportunity of being a good leader: when you'll be in charge of people, you can tell them this simple principle: "you know, when we work together if you're finished with a task I gave you, could you please tell me about its completion? This way, I can remove it from my to-do list."

Being a good follower also means to understand what the leader requires and provide it to him/her. Be a good follower and you'll make a better team. And the upper management will notice it. And guess who do they want as their direct report? Someone who understands the pros and cons of assigning tasks to people. So being a good follower puts us in a good position for promotion.

Cheers!

Lucio Buffalmano and Matthew Whitewood have reacted to this post.
Lucio BuffalmanoMatthew Whitewood

Great, great principle, John!

So yes, yet so helpful.

I still remember the first project manager I learned from and the great tip he gave me when he said: "when I was learning, whenever I was done with a task, I'd always send an email saying "done".

Among the reason why it's a good strategy, I'd also add:

  • It's power-positive: the boss feels like you respect him, his authority, and his power position. Bosses always prefer to promote those who respect their power
  • It develops deeper relationship / alliance: the boss who receives "done" and "accomplishment notes" feels like he can count on you, that you're on his side, and that you are a good ally. Bosses always prefer to promote good allies.
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Matthew WhitewoodJohn FreemanTransitioned
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

Great idea.  I used to do this and now have been reminded.

Another habit along the same lines I'd recommend is a Monday and Friday email.  Telling the boss 1-3 things you're planning to achieve this week (of course either aligned to their priorities or with a y its important).  Then Friday is the wrap-up/status email

Having run agile teams myself I'd say that not many teams use their board/trello whatever well.  And bosses get lost in the cards jungle.

It makes you organised, provides some external motivation and if the boss is always switching tasks on you (firefighter type boss) provides some evidence.

Matthew Whitewood and John Freeman have reacted to this post.
Matthew WhitewoodJohn Freeman
Quote from Transitioned on February 23, 2021, 5:28 am

Another habit along the same lines I'd recommend is a Monday and Friday email.  Telling the boss 1-3 things you're planning to achieve this week (of course either aligned to their priorities or with a y its important).  Then Friday is the wrap-up/status email

Great one as well.

Especially helpful to avoid flooding your boss with lots of small "done" emails, that if repeated too often can seem like a nuisance or like you're trying too hard to be pleasing.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?
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