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Prioritize Sleep for Power

Hello guys,

it's been since I'm a teenager that I've been procrastinating this one decision: prioritzing sleep.

I've encountered this idea through Tom Bilyeu who advocates that "hustling" with sleep deprivation is stupid as it deprives you from precious IQ points. When we're sleep deprived, our cognition works just like if we are slightly drunk.

I talked about detachment these days as it is an emotional state conducive to better decisions and choices therefore to more power. However, to be detached we need to have the emotional ability to detach. And sleep helps us to stay detach.

For the moment, I still procrastinate going to sleep as it is a bad habit I acquired in my teenage years. However, now I sleep in the morning as much as I need. I am also more aware of my sleep.

I can function on sleep deprivation but after a long time I decided to stop living like this as there are more disadvantages than advantages.

So I can now say: I am the kind of man who prioritize his sleep.

My next step is to stop delaying the moment I go to bed.

What do you think?

I couldn't agree more.

But I might not be a role model here: I don't function too well on sleep deprivation, and I naturally always placed a high value on sleep -and, evne more, on waking up time-.
"Having" to wake up early to go to work might have been one the main motivations for me to go out on my own -crazy, if you think about it-.

Waking up with an alarm felt like constriction and powerlessness.
Waking up "naturally" to me means freedom, it means waking up happy, ready to take on the day on my terms.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

I agree with you. That is why on the long term I’m planning on becoming rich. For the freedom not for the toys.

Actually, in terms of power moves, I do best when I'm happy and slightly energetic, or indifferent and tired. When I'm tired, it forces me to speak slower and utilize my diaphragm more. My body language is also more aligned with what power looks like, because I only have so much energy to respond to essential stimuli.

Something similar happens when I have gone to a concert the night before. My throat gets a bit fucked up, but it forces me to talk with a really deep voice and talk slower. IME having too much energy can be a bad thing. I've gotten really amped up before, which made me feel like I had to answer every single question asked of me, making me play directly into peoples' power games. Too much energy can also make you look a bit bipolar.

In addition, sometimes being tired can lower your inhibition to execute power moves since you're not overthinking it, it also works the other way around too, when power moves are pulled on you, they hurt less. Being tired can help if you tend to overanalyze things.

Having said all this, I don't advise purposely being tired for the sake of power moves as it can interfere with your daily life (work, activities, driving, etc), and there are diminishing returns for this. To stay within the happy medium, I would advise to do what it took to be able to sustain a happy, and calm frame of mind sustainably. 

 

An interesting take, JP.

I agree with you that there can be some advantages of being tired, sleepless, or out of sorts.

The "conservation of energy" attitude you mention that slows you down.
Or the inhibition go down, and some people who tend to be more on the passive side can be suddenly move higher up and be more assertive or aggressive -albeit some can as easily overdo it and do even more damage-.

It's also a good reminder that you can always look at the positive of things.
So instead of telling yourself "I slept too little today, I'm not going to perform well, you can flip it and focus on some positive".

But, as you say, as a rule of thumb I'd still recommend people to sleep as long as they need, whenever they can.

 

Quote from JP on October 15, 2020, 7:25 am

Something similar happens when I have gone to a concert the night before. My throat gets a bit fucked up, but it forces me to talk with a really deep voice and talk slower. IME having too much energy can be a bad thing. I've gotten really amped up before, which made me feel like I had to answer every single question asked of me, making me play directly into peoples' power games. Too much energy can also make you look a bit bipolar.

Yeah, the voice after a night of partying, that happens to me too.
Sounds SO much better. Sometimes I wonder if there would be a way to keep it that way, but if there is, I haven't found out yet.

 

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

Yes, JP, there are side effects to sleep deprivation that can be used as an advantage. Like having a low voice when you partied too much.

However, I think the disadvantages outweigh way too much the advantages. That is why I find detachment to be such an effective tool. You can be rested AND be cool and in control. It's a learnable skill.

I think you might be confusing having energy with being excited. Energy is like health in my opinion, you can never have too much of it. It's how you manage and spend it that is different.

I'll give you 2 examples:

  1. Listening: a few years ago I thought that people who were not talking had nothing to say. I thought they were not interesting. I was doing all the talking and they were listening. I can listen AND I can talk. However, one is more advantageous as a default strategy for a learner and it is listening.
  2. Moving fast: at work I was moving fast all the time and therefore I was depleting my energy quite fast. Now I move slower but I work almost as fast. I take more time to get things done but I'm not going over my head or get all spread out. However, when necessary I can accelerate and work faster.

So it is the same with energy. You want to conserve energy. However, you want to have as much as you can.

Quote from John Freeman on October 18, 2020, 6:12 pm
  1. Moving fast: at work I was moving fast all the time and therefore I was depleting my energy quite fast. Now I move slower but I work almost as fast. I take more time to get things done but I'm not going over my head or get all spread out. However, when necessary I can accelerate and work faster.

I like this concept a lot.

It might be a bit like an actual engine, actually.
If you go at 100% (pedal to the metal) you go just a bit faster than if you went to 90%, but not much.

The curve is non-linear, and the same goes for the side effects.
At 100% you stress the engine and consume fuel FAR quicker than the simple difference in speed would warrant.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

The curve is non-linear, and the same goes for the side effects.
At 100% you stress the engine and consume fuel FAR quicker than the simple difference in speed would warrant.

Exactly, well put. That's exactly it. Having the turbo always on burns too much fuel if the intended purpose does not warrant a race (for instance: going to the groceries).