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To protect against fuckery: tell people you're a lawyer (but never say so if you're a buyer in a seller's market)

Complicated title, right?

What the hell does it even mean "never say you're a lawyer if you're a buyer in a seller's market?".

OK, let me give you an example.

Imagine you're renting out a place in a city where lots of people are looking for places.
Such as, you're a seller in a seller's market.

One of the interested people tells you they're a lawyer:

lawyer introduction

What would you think?
Would you be more or less interested in renting to them?

Well, that depends.

If all your "i's" are dotted and all your "t's" are crossed, and if you always do everything by the book, then maybe no issue there.

But if not, if you're more of a guy who relies on gentleman's agreements, you know that a lawyer has more leverage on you than a non-lawyer.

A lawyer could nitpick on any issue and potentially use it against you. Either during the negotiation or, far worse, later.
Plus, lawyers being always in court and always talking about legal cases, they also have an easier trigger on suing and going to court. And who wants to deal with that?

In short: a lawyer is more likely to be a tough negotiator and is more likely to cause you troubles.

So if the seller has several people to choose from, he will probably go with the one who is not a lawyer.
Don't disclose information that adds no real value in the best case, but is likely to harm on you in the worst case.

This is a specific case of a general rule.
You might be better off not disclosing your full power before the negotiation ends when you need the seller but the seller doesn't need you.


Say you're a lawyer once you're already in

Now, on the first part of the title.

Things change once you have concluded the transaction -in this case, once you are in the flat as a renter-.

Then, it can make sense to disclose you're a lawyer, as that will decrease the likelihood of any fuckery on the renter's side.

As a matter of fact, it can make sense to lie that you're a lawyer.

In the past I have used that as a technique to protect myself against cheats.

Where I have been living it was SO common for landlords to never pay back the deposit that it was disgusting.
That was such a high risk than some friends of mine didn't even consider it a risk: they just considered the deposit as lost money.

So to protect myself against that, after I got a place, the details of my job would soon change when it came to the owner.
It's not anymore "a startup", but it's a "legal startup".
Or maybe I changed job to a high-powered legal firm. Great job and great perks, you know. As a high-placed employee, you don't even need to cover the expenses in case you sue and lose* (read: I would have no qualms in suing you if you try to fuck me)!

*Of course the "perk" makes no sense, but it's just an example. And it would actually work great if you're dealing with more clueless folks (the majority)

Stef has reacted to this post.
Stef
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

this is cool, also I am a Lawyer so I would not even have to lie 🙂

Quote from Stef on September 9, 2020, 9:52 pm

this is cool, also I am a Lawyer so I would not even have to lie ?

Even better, comes across as more natural 😀

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Stef
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?
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