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Tony Robbins social climbing

Tony Robbins is awesome.

Even if you watch the full video of this case study, you end with the idea that this guy is a beautiful soul.

Maybe the reason why I want more from him is that he's done so much in his life, and done so much for the world, that you'd almost wished him to be perfect.
So you could look up at someone and say "man, that guy is truly, 100% a role model".

I'm afraid though there aren't "perfect" role models.
And even expecting so is misguided, and even unfair to the real-life, imperfect role models.

Now back to us:

Social Climbing Power Dynamics

Sometimes I'd just wish Tony Robbins stopped the "social climbing in absentia".

Robbins: I get the call when the athletes are burning down on national television (...) I get the phone call when the president of the United States calls me, true story, and says "they're going to impeach me in the morning, what should I do. And I'm like 31 years old and I'm like "dude, could you call me sooner"

Man, if Bill Clinton had a dollar every time Robbins shared about this call, he wouldn't even need his Clinton Foundation anymore.

Unluckily that story ends up being quite value and power-taking for Clinton (and the other people he lists in there)

Think about it:

  • He self-frames as the one able to help anyone:

Of course, that's why he shares the story.
His goal is to sub-communicate that "if I can help these top 1% sports and life performers, I sure can help anyone".

But that also:

  • Frames the athletes as needy and unable to help themselves:

Maybe true.

Athletes are persons, and that should be pretty obvious that anyone can go through difficult times.

Obvious to anyone who knows basic human nature.

And still... It's up to the athletes to decide when and if to communicate what they did in their difficult times.

We don't need to be reminded of that publicly, together with names and events.

He says Serena called when her sister died.
The whole point of coaching and therapy should be to find someone to share your burden with and who keeps it private.

That, in my eyes, makes Tony Robbins look cheap.

It pains me to say, but definitely not a high-quality behavior.

  • He frames Clinton as desperate:

When he says Clinton called and said "what should I do" that empowers Robbins, but disempowers Clinton because it makes him look clueless.

Did Clinton really say "what should I do", or did he call and ask for opinions in a higher-power fashion?

We'll never know, but this version sure makes Clinton seem lower power and Robbins higher power

  • His "relatable just a 31-YO move" further disempowers Clinton

He seeks to make his story more relatable when he was "just a 31 years old dude".

Sure, now we can all smile and look at Tony and says "yeah, he too he's just a human being and when he was younger he must have felt some pressure to deliver".

But by lowering his own power, he pushes Clinton even further down.
Now the president of the US he's asking for help from a coach who doesn't even have the life-experience, knowledge, and confidence to help.

  • Power move on Clinton

To self-frame himself as strong and confident enough to reproach the president, he disempowers Clinton yet again when he shares that his answer to Clinton's request for was "dude, could you called me sooner" (I'd wager a bet he didn't answer like that on the phone)

Ali Scarlett, Matthew Whitewood and Growfast have reacted to this post.
Ali ScarlettMatthew WhitewoodGrowfast
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

I'm thinking if I was at the interview, should I say something to re-empower Clinton, the athletes and other individuals?
Or maybe dismiss Tony Robbin's frame of being the person everybody chases for help?

I'm thinking a surfacing/uncovering remark on his exaggeration could work:

Tony: And I'm like 31 years old and I'm like "dude, could you call me sooner"

Me: Did you say that to Clinton?

Or

Tony: I get the phone call when the president of the United States calls me, true story, and says "they're going to impeach me in the morning, what should I do.

Me: Did Clinton really say that? "What should I do?"

Although it could be good to let Tony Robbins brag and let him feel good during the interview because he's not taking a power position over you directly.

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

I have personally stopped listening to some channels when I felt that the interviewer was failing his job of interviewing.

For example, giving a platform to individuals with big claims but little evidence.

So I stopped listening to Tom Bilyeu. Albeit I still think the guy is awesome, I see little benefits in having a smart and good interviewer if that interviewer applies no filters and no critical thinking.
Most shows/interviews are people who invite each other to talk as an exchange of audience, and that's why they never pose the tough question.
Then you might as well listen to a sales pitch or to marketing material.

That being said, it wasn't easy here to challenge Robbins.
But both of your options are really good.
They aren't aggressive or competitive in any way.
And they don't even necessarily imply that Robbins is lying. It's more like feeding it back to him, as if to say "wow, that sounds crazy, did he really say that", and that allows him to either confirm, or admit that he's exaggerating a bit for impact's sake.
But the act of drawing attention to the fact that "it seems strange those exact words were exchanged" is a great step already.

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

I have personally stopped listening to some channels when I felt that the interviewer was failing his job of interviewing.

I do see lots of interviews being chit-chat and vibing rather than getting to the truth and opening up insightful discussions.

I think interviewing to get great insight is a challenging skill.
You have to not make the interviewee defensive and, at the same time, you want to dive deeper.
People are getting bored of generic platitudes.

At the same time, one should invite interviewees who are willing to dive into uncomfortable topics and not just present a favourable image of themsleves.

The other extreme is an interviewer who wants to destroy the interviewee.
Like Cathy Newman interviewing Jordan Peterson.
Also, unproductive to getting towards the facts and having objective discussions.

As such, it's good to set the frame at the start with something like

Let's ask each other the difficult questions here.
We will probably agree on some things and have different perspectives on others.
But let's not shy away from those topics.

Challenging Robbins

That being said, it wasn't easy here to challenge Robbins.
But both of your options are really good.
They aren't aggressive or competitive in any way.
And they don't even necessarily imply that Robbins is lying. It's more like feeding it back to him, as if to say "wow, that sounds crazy, did he really say that", and that allows him to either confirm, or admit that he's exaggerating a bit for impact's sake.
But the act of drawing attention to the fact that "it seems strange those exact words were exchanged" is a great step already.

Thanks for the feedback.
I think Robbins is quite savvy in humblebragging.

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