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What do you want to do tonight? The same thing we do every night. Try to take over the world!

Hey there,

I'm Alex, a self-made successful entrepreneur and psychology enthusiast.

I've discovered TPM a few weeks ago. I was initially searching for some frame control techniques to improve my romantic relationships, and I was literally blown away by the quality and depth of the content that's shared here, both in regard to the seduction part and to the business part.

I've been immediately hooked as I've had first-hand experience with a lot of concepts that Lucio is sharing here, and noticed I was still oblivious to a lot of other things.

Since then, I've commited to read the blog and devour the courses at least 1 hour per day as I take my success and self-growth very seriously. I'm still in the early stage of my carreer as an entrepreneur, but this is literally helping me to save a lot of years of hard work and painful experiences that would be required to figure out all of this by myself.

I would like to take the opportunity to express my gratitude to Lucio for the great value he has been sharing, and I'm looking forward to strategize with you all.

Cheers.

PS: If you're wondering, the title is a reference to "Pinky And The Brain" ;).

Lucio Buffalmano, Matthew Whitewood and Mist1102 have reacted to this post.
Lucio BuffalmanoMatthew WhitewoodMist1102

Awesome post, and awesome to have you on board, Alex!

Eager to learn with you / from you.

Mist1102 and Alex have reacted to this post.
Mist1102Alex
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

P.S.: loved the reference.

I remember hearing that line in the cartoon years ago and thinking "that's my guy" :).

What cartoons and characters people prefer also tells you a lot about them.
In Family Guy I used to like Stewie a lot when he was all about plotting. A girl I watched the cartoons with liked Peter, and that reflected very well on how we thought.

And then I think it's also good to grow beyond that stage and into a more communal type of leadership.
But it's part of a curve, and it's not good to stay stuck with the naive character. Machiavellian thinking is important, if not necessary in life.

Mist1102 and Alex have reacted to this post.
Mist1102Alex
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

Welcome Alex!

I'm excited to hear you doing the party.

This is a great place with excellent people and information.

Happy growing friend!

Peace.

Alex has reacted to this post.
Alex

Since then, I've commited to read the blog and devour the courses at least 1 hour per day as I take my success and self-growth very seriously. I'm still in the early stage of my carreer as an entrepreneur, but this is literally helping me to save a lot of years of hard work and painful experiences that would be required to figure out all of this by myself.

I lost a lot of time and money over the years so I share this sentiment.

I think Mark Zuckerberg is very Machiavellian despite not having a good "feel" in the initial days when he was starting out.
But he's communal as well by the very nature of social media.

The creator of Family Guy is probably very power-aware.

Cheers to taking over the world!

Alex has reacted to this post.
Alex
Thanks for the warm welcome guys!

What cartoons and characters people prefer also tells you a lot about them.
In Family Guy I used to like Stewie a lot when he was all about plotting. A girl I watched the cartoons with liked Peter, and that reflected very well on how we thought.

And then I think it's also good to grow beyond that stage and into a more communal type of leadership.
But it's part of a curve, and it's not good to stay stuck with the naive character. Machiavellian thinking is important, if not necessary in life.

Indeed, the characters I liked and identified the most with as a kid said a lot about my own personality (or at least my then forming identity). I used to identify to independent, shrewd and ambitious characters such as Uncle Scrooge, but I also had a more idealistic side.

I agree regarding the need to grow to a communal type of leadership, and that's one of the things I really appreciate about your blog because it's not just about being self-serving and domineering in an unhealthy way (as promoted in most Red Pill and PUA communities, or power books like Robert Greene's), you also teach about the necessity to build high value, long-term and win-win dynamics (while not being overly politically correct as naively promoted in most mainstream business and self-improvement books). This realistic and healthy kind of balance is what attracted me to your content in the first place, in addition to its high quality.

Are you interested by developmental psychology? I'm thinking about theoretical models like Spiral Dynamics in particular.

I think that an "empowering", enlightened and communal type of leadership is more efficient, not just as a way to get more results in the long term at an individual level, but also in societies as a whole, because it allows individuals in the society to grow to higher levels of personal development, and thus leave room for emerging creativity and innovation.
And I believe that is what society sorely needs to be able to face global challenges and crisis that are coming in the next decades.

If societies like China are stagnating economically (middle-income trap), this is because they inherently don't promote the emergence of creativity (top-down control and centralization constrain the individual too much). This is good for effectiveness in Fordist production lines where the individual needs to strictly follow the protocol like a machine without any self-expression, but since innovation is the highest value you can produce in society (low supply and scarcity, virtually endless demand), I don't think they will be able to grow much further if they don't evolve their leadership style (even though most people that don't have any systemic view of politics are impressed by the short-term results of this kind of society and take it as an example). Complex and open systems are always superior to closed and simple ones as stated by the law of requisite variety. You cannot build an anti-fragile society if it is not adaptative.

That's why modern-day heroes are people like Elon Musk (because they have the capacity to innovate and to lead this innovation). And that's why rich and smart people put their kids in Montessori schools where their kids are taught to be proactive, not to obey and conform.

This is a great place with excellent people and information.

No doubt about that, and I'm always excited to join driven and high-quality communities (even though that's extremely rare). This almost always lead to exciting discoveries, opportunities and value sharing :).

I lost a lot of time and money over the years so I share this sentiment.

Likewise. If I told you how much money I lost over the years because of bettrayal and bad deals, you would probably suffocate. I learned this kind of things the hard way, but eventually all of these were good experiences that allowed me to grow. "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger".

I think Mark Zuckerberg is very Machiavellian despite not having a good "feel" in the initial days when he was starting out.

Yeah, a bit too Machiavellian for my taste, but this definitely contributed to his success.

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

Great message, Alex.

Are you interested by developmental psychology? I'm thinking about theoretical models like Spiral Dynamics in particular.

Spiral Dynamics is in my reading list, and I look forward to getting there :).

Alex has reacted to this post.
Alex
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?
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