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Why Are Hillary Clinton's Fake Smiles During Debates With Donald Trump Bad For Her?

I was thinking why Hillary Clinton's fake smiles during debates are bad.

Sometimes smirking is good as a sarcastic means like what a female socialite did to shut down Trump's sexist remark.

I suppose the problem is that she is smiling while Trump continues to speak.
She is not bringing the attention away from Donald Trump.
This makes her look like following Trump's conversational lead.
This gives some weight to Trump's allegations in some sense.

Yeah, when in that video I said "fake smiles" I was making a general comment about Hillary's many "forced" smiles, not necessarily saying "this specific instance was terrible".

They are bad because they turn her into the perfect caricature of the fake politician that wants to be liked to get votes.

But still, that specific instance wasn't particularly good either.

Shaking her head with a smile while exhaling slightly as if to say "gosh, I can't believe this terrible liar is even running for president" would have been better.

Edit:
Those two situations have "smiles" in common, but are otherwise very different that I personally wouldn't compare them to each other.

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Quote from Lucio Buffalmano on April 17, 2021, 4:02 am

Edit:
Those two situations have "smiles" in common, but are otherwise very different that I personally wouldn't compare them to each other.

Looks like I missed this by quite a bit.
Thanks for helping me with the dynamics.

The difference in their smiles is

  • Hillary Clinton's smile: looks forced and fake
  • Second Woman's smile: sarcastic and deflecting
Quote from Lucio Buffalmano on April 17, 2021, 4:02 am

Yeah, when in that video I said "fake smiles" I was making a general comment about Hillary's many "forced" smiles, not necessarily saying "this specific instance was terrible".

They are bad because they turn her into the perfect caricature of the fake politician that wants to be liked to get votes.

I see what you mean.
I have to take into account the wider dynamics of the image that Hillary was portraying.
The fake smiles added up to an image of insincerity for Hillary Clinton.

Shaking her head with a smile while exhaling slightly as if to say "gosh, I can't believe this terrible liar is even running for president" would have been better.

This looks like a powerful, non-verbal that can be very useful in quite a few circumstances.

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selffriend

Clinton is trying to look friendly, honest, and likable with her smiles.

It's a fake smile trying to pass for honest.

The second lady is the opposite: her smile is supposed to look fake. That's the whole message: "your lewd joke doesn't deserve an honest smile".

The fake smile is (part of ) the power move.

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Matthew Whitewood
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It finally came to me.

It's deception vs sarcasm played out via non-verbals.

The fake smile is a form of deception. The more subtle and closer to reality, the better and more effective.

The sarcastic smile comveys irony. It is meant to be more overt to convey the irony. It has to be overt enough to be effective.

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Lucio Buffalmano

Exactly.

One is fake supposed to be fake.

The other one is fake trying to seem natural and likable -and largely failing at it-.

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Matthew Whitewood
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