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Mindset about time management

Hello Lucio,

this is a specific question for you. You spoke several times of how you are very careful with your time usage. You said that you are "jealous of your time", rightly so. I believe.

I would like to learn from your mindset about time management. I am still someone who wastes time with Internet and other things. I do understand that in my context of an individualistic society + technology it makes things worst. However, I would like to be more in control and use my time more productively.

Could you please explain how you think about time and how did you acquire this mindset?

Here is one I found through my supervisor:

"Be the master of your time"

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Quote from John Freeman on February 13, 2021, 4:54 pm

"Be the master of your time"

Yeah, that's it pretty much.

I'm certainly far above the average of people when it comes to putting time into productive use.
And when I'm sitting somewhere waiting for something and didn't bring my Kindle, laptop, or headset, I often think "damn, what a missed opportunity not to take them along".
And that's because I see "waiting" as lost time.

Still, I'm not a nazi on that.

Chill time is also important to regroup, enjoying life is also important, and some activities that could be considered "waste" are not waste in my line of business -observing people, interacting, even watching YB video for unconventional social situations can be instructive-.
The same can be said for most people seeking to develop their social skills and social intuition, it's possible to combine pleasure with learning.

Where I am quite a nazi though is in being the master of my time.

Various business steps described around this forum all go in that direction, including:

  • No direct selling
  • No convincing anyone of anything (including privacy)
  • No coaching (besides not being anyone to coach anyone)
  • No push emails
  • No push notification from various apps
  • No employees
  • Turning down, avoiding, limiting all commitments & responsibilities requiring specific timeframes

Etc. etc.

Matthew Whitewood and John Freeman have reacted to this post.
Matthew WhitewoodJohn Freeman
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

"Be the master of your time"

I view time as a resource.
It helps to see if you are expending resources on the areas of priorities that you set out.

I use RescueTime to track how I spend my time, and it delivers weekly reports on how I spend my time.
The great thing is that it is automatic, but the service is not free.
Based on what I define to be productive and distracting, it automatically tracks how I much time I spend in each category of productive, neutral, distracting.

I am sad to say I am spending on average only 3 hours a day on the areas that matter personally most to me.
I get distracted by too many "urgent" and "short-term tasks".
This concerns me greatly about whether I am structuring my life correctly as Lucio mentions about being the master of your time.

I'm quite far from being an expert on time management.
I can definitely structure my time better.
I am seeing how to learn techniques and mindsets from other successful people as well.

To answer the question directly, in my view,

Managing time is a key activity to allocate this relatively finite resource to priorities that advance your long-term interests.

My Personal Examples

GOOD AREAS

Spending time learning power dynamics: yes, helps me advance my goals by influencing people effectively through collaboration.
Spending time to learn tech skills: yes, helps me to work with technical people and build valuable products towards whatever long-term objective you want
Spending time to manage time better: yes, gives me more time to spend time on the above

BAD AREAS

Spending time arguing just to prove your point: no, doesn't really help advance my interests. Also bad for growth and relationships.
Spending time to take revenge: maybe marginal benefits in drawing boundaries in some cases, but not really the best use of time.

GREY AREAS

Spending time to make money: If money is a constraint to advance my goals, yes then, by all means, go get more money.
Money confers status and influence as well, which are important in achieving goals.
But it must be the right type of status and influence in the right context.

Spending time to draw boundaries: If this relationship with this person is important in long-term goals, yes because we need to move forward productively and in a win-win collaborative manner. Both parties must not feel short-changed or stepped upon.

Spending time around value-takers: Can you achieve your longer-term goals through working with this value-taker while minimising the more immediate, obvious costs?

The Constraint of Having To Sleep Affects How We Structure Time

I'm not sure if this goes under mindset.
I see sleep as a big constraint as to how to structure time.
We have to continuously spend about 1/3 of our time to sleep.
This creates constraints on how much you can squeeze into a day with regards to prioritisation and habits.

If only we can sleep for 16 hours at the end of every 48 hours, then we can tick that both the box and spend the rest of 32 hours batching other tasks together.
This really helps for challenging topics which require a long batch time to go into a more focused mode and get more time out of it.

I always wondered if I can structure my sleep differently.
I was looking into polyphasic sleep.

I Have Similar Beliefs For Money

I have similar beliefs when it comes to money.
Both can have multiplying effects when used optimally.
Although how to manage money is a different concept because it behaves quite differently as a resource.

For example, spending time to influence the right people effectively or build a relationship with.
And making money on your vision to spend on your vision through a business.

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

Matthew: I view time as a resource.
It helps to see if you are expending resources on the areas of priorities that you set out.

Yes, it's a good approach I think.

Especially for those who are pursuing goals and objectives in life.

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?
Quote from Lucio Buffalmano on February 13, 2021, 6:03 pm

Chill time is also important to regroup, enjoying life is also important, and some activities that could be considered "waste" are not waste in my line of business -observing people, interacting, even watching YB video for unconventional social situations can be instructive-.
The same can be said for most people seeking to develop their social skills and social intuition, it's possible to combine pleasure with learning.

I went to find the article on Warren Buffet's view on time.

What Warren Buffett taught Bill Gates about managing time by sharing his (nearly) blank calendar

Richard Branson also shares this mindset of down-time.
It's important to let the mind wander.

Having a blank calendar at times is fantastic.
Because then you have no pressure on yourself.
If you are naturally curious and motivated, there's no need to fill up your calendar.

Mixing pleasure and relaxation with learning as Lucio mentions.

If you are naturally curious and motivated, there's no need to fill up your calendar.

That's also true.
If you're naturally driving, then you might need less "calendar pushing" and, sometimes, more pushing in the opposite direction -taking breaks and spending time with the people we care about-.

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

We talked about

  • Time as a resource
  • Importance of down-time
  • Good idea to not fill up your calendar

This person has an interesting perspective on time management:

You multiply your time by giving yourself the emotional permission to spend time on things today that will give you time tomorrow.

I believe that I left out the emotional component when discussing time management.

To motivate yourself to do unpleasant but important tasks, you can imagine how this will pay off in the future.
Visualisation and bringing the feeling to the moment.

For example, how to motivate yourself to come out time to practice your presentation skills?
One session does not make much difference so you might feel like skipping it today.
Visualising how you bring 400 days worth of practice into a presentation next year can really motivate you to put in the time for practice now.

OFF-TOPIC

He's a really solid presenter.
I'm going to observe what makes him compelling and interesting to listen to.
Vocals and posture are a huge part.

OFF-TOPIC