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Are the dynamics of shame attacks and "power borrowing" frames of what's good/bad in society similar?

I thought that I should open a new thread because it veers slightly off-topic from the social exchange principle and Ali's example

Quote from Lucio Buffalmano on May 26, 2021, 7:07 pm from What's In It For Me, Never Forget It

Frame Spreading

On "frame spreading" that Ali mentions, I think it's a great point.

This would end up being a subset of "power borrowing", where you borrow power from various different social norms that most people either approve or, or disapprove of (can have a thread for this, or maybe into the dictionary thread).

Something similar happened to me recently where someone told that "if I wanted to help the locals, then I'd go for this option here". The implied frame there was that helping the locals was good, and if I didn't, I wasn't being good.
That was also leveraging a commonly-held belief that "helping locals" is good -and, in some cases, it can be true. Not always though, and can be abused-.

Do you think that shame attacks and "power borrowing", implied frames of what's good/bad in society are similar?

My impression is that shame attacks are stronger & more direct and actively seek to ostracise a person from society by portraying the person as not aligned with society's ethical standards.
It targets the person and his/her character.

"Power borrowing", implied frames are more covert.
Often, they may not be so personal and could be directed more towards an action/behaviour/situation.

For the remark,

if I wanted to help the locals, then I'd go for this option here

This is not so strong.
Because it's more towards a specific option rather than targeting someone personally.

A shame attack would be

This option would help the locals.
Not helping the locals is wrong.

The analogy would be shaming is akin to direct aggression.
And covert, "power borrowing" frame from social norms is more like covert aggression.

Yeah, I'd say that most shame attacks latch onto something that society would naturally condemn as "bad".

It's difficult to shame someone effectively while going against society and/or culture.

One can hardly publicly shame you, for example, by framing you as a honest man.
But one can far more easily shame by framing you as a conman.

SHAMING VS POWER BORROWING

Power borrowing is the bigger category.

It's a very wide category, you can "power borrow" in a million different ways.

I can't remember the name, but when a former marine wanted to defend himself publicly, he put on the military uniform with all the medals. That was a form of power borrowing as people tend to respec uniforms -especially in the US-.

Or I could simply say "as big-name-researcher-says".. and I power borrowed from a famous researcher's status -I've done it when I used Freud as an example of a poor scientist as I needed that "extra power", so I quoted Martin Seligman, see "Power Intelligence"-.

Shaming is a specific former of power borrowing, where you "turbocharge" your frame with appeals to ethical standards and values, trying to frame someone as a monster.

Matthew:

if I wanted to help the locals, then I'd go for this option here

This is not so strong.
Because it's more towards a specific option rather than targeting someone personally.

No, not particularly strong indeed.
Still annoying though, I'm not happy anyone's trying to manipulate me into a certain choice, or imply that I'm being "not nice" if I don't go for what they prefer :).

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