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Best diet, food, or nutrition for power

In this regard, it is critical to separate the concepts of hierarchy of evidence (which generally describe quality of evidence) and standards of proof. For example, it is not controversial that observational epidemiology can demonstrate association, but cannot demonstrate causation. But is the clear demonstration of causation an absolute requirement for improving population health? If it were, there would be no public health policy. From the 1964 US Surgeon General’s report on smoking in which tobacco smoking was deemed a “cause” of cancers based off of observational epidemiology, to the evaluation of the public health success of vaccinations, observational research plays an integral role in the formulation and evaluation of policy. By implication, it is clear that RCTs cannot be a prerequisite to set effective policy for reducing population disease burden.

What? it sounds like, we formulate public health policy on bullshit cause bullshit is practical (and sometimes you can get it right by coincidence), discovering the truth is hard.

The most dangerous types of reality distortions when it comes to psychosis and murder are “auditory commands hallucination.”

To think that in some people eating  bread may (via neurogluten/neuroinflammation) induce psychosis!

@lucio

Highly Recommend Reading:

The Carnivore Code

By Paul Saladino M. D.

He did an awesome job explaining so much on his book...

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Quote from Stef on June 26, 2021, 10:39 am

@lucio

Highly Recommend Reading:

The Carnivore Code

By Paul Saladino M. D.

He did an awesome job explaining so much on his book...

Interesting.

If you want to write a review later on, happy to read.

And I'm gonna throw a curveball at you, Stef.

How about you read a book that disproves your current beliefs around meat?

Something extolling the virtues of vegetarianism, or at least of a diversified diet.
Would be curious to hear what you'll think of it

Stef has reacted to this post.
Stef
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

I have! (they fail, at least in regard of the meat of a wild/healthy non poisonous animal), also i see humans almost like i see tigers, would be hard to demonstrate a tiger needs a more varied diet to thrive (a variety of meats maybe) When I was younger I read books about plant benefits, Saladino himself was a Vegan when younger.

And most of what get publish today says good things about at least some plants.

I may do a very short summary, but I considere his books precisely that, a summary of a topic that can get a lot more extensive if we try to cover every detail.

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

"AH, MY FRIENDS, what a journey it has been. At long last, we have arrived in the Promised Land. As we stand on a coastline with some decent looking surf, we find that we are surrounded by verdant pastures on which healthy ruminants graze under the warm sun and drink from clean, flowing streams. Before we take up the bow and head off hunting or go rambling to the ocean to collect some shellfish, let’s rest for a moment on the grass and reflect on our journey thus far.
At the beginning of our adventures to find the lost user manual, we saw that stable isotope analyses of fossils strongly suggests our ancestors were high-level carnivores. They ate mostly large animals and displayed higher levels of δ15 nitrogen than those of contemporary carnivores, like hyenas. We also dug into the data regarding duplications in the salivary amylase gene and discussed why the fact that only Homo sapiens possess this suggests strongly that we have not had many starchy foods in our diet for the majority of our evolution. An examination of the size of the human brain revealed the striking finding that, about 2 million years ago, our noggins started increasing in size dramatically, right when we began hunting animals and using stone tools and weapons. This trend continued up until about 40,000 years ago. No one knows why our brains have been shrinking since then, but it’s intriguing to note that this point in our history correlates with the advent of agriculture and a decrease in our access to B12 and other nutrients vital for brain health found predominantly in animal foods.
When we consider the sharp decline in human health observed with changes in the human diet at the time of the Neolithic Revolution, “the worst mistake in human history” might just be an accurate characterization of our decision to join the cult of the seed. In the final chapter of this book, we’ll talk more about the impact mono-crop agriculture has had on our environment, but it’s not pretty. In contrast to the way that this type of farming depletes the land of precious nutrients and leads to erosion of topsoil, the grazing of ruminant animals in a manner consistent with their evolutionary place within grassland ecosystems enriches the land and increases the carbon-carrying capacity of the soil.1After exploring our human origins as hunters and remembering that hunting and eating animals made us into the amazing beings we are today, we journeyed through the dangerous lands of plant toxins. Roaming in the isothiocyanate jungle, we saw that these compounds aren’t our friends after all but are just out to harm our thyroid glands and damage our DNA. Within the hinterlands, the true nature of polyphenols was revealed to us. We discovered that these plant defense molecules were little more than toxins that benefit only plants and supplement manufacturers. Across the oxalate desert we bravely traveled, learning a myriad of ways in which this molecule can harm our joints and kidneys and how it can become deposited in soft tissues, causing unnecessary pain and suffering. After crossing the rough seas of plant lectins and observing how these molecules can damage our gut, we finally arrived on the shores of the next phase of our journey.
We fought on with unbroken spirits, quickly learning of the incredible nutritional density of animal foods and of the many misleading fables told to us about the nutritional value of plants. The next leg of our quest saw us undergo a series of challenging trials as we thoroughly debunked the pernicious notions that plant fiber is necessary or beneficial for humans and that red meat will cause cancer or shorten our life. In a display of formidable prowess, we then slayed the biggest dragon of them all as we dispatched the incorrect notions that eating animals will cause heart disease and that LDL is something to be feared. With thuds that shook the earth, these giants fell after careful examination of the scientific evidence and consideration of our evolutionary past.
As I said at the outset of our adventures, this book is going to ruffle a whole lot of feathers. There will be many detractors, and I look forward to answering their criticisms as we continue on this path to positively impact as many lives as possible. Ultimately, the true test of the information I have shared within this book will be improvements in our personal health as we shift to a nose-to-tail carnivore diet. In this chapter, I’ll break down how to do this so that we have all of the tools needed to eat like our ancestors did. In return, all that I ask is this: if you find benefit in this way of eating and this way of life, do not remain silent about it. Share your experience with your tribe and those who may benefit from this diet as well. The world needs to know what we have learned. They need to know that although we’ve lost the way and are being led astray, we can regain our vitality by remembering where we came from."

Paul Saladino himself, he asked to share so I did.

I will comment later on the things I disagree about the book (not so many yet still...)

@lucio

Frankly the only thing I find ridicule in the carnivore code is the part in which Saladino tries to pretend there is no cruelty involved in butchering animals for food, to me there is almost always going to be some level of cruelty when you kill a living organism with something like a brain and some capacity for emotions.

For a guy I consider pretty smart, I dont know why he did such a simplistic and irrational analysis of the topic of animal cruelty.

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Lucio BuffalmanoMatthew Whitewood
Quote from Stef on July 2, 2021, 1:54 am

Frankly the only thing I find ridicule in the carnivore code is the part in which Saladino tries to pretend there is no cruelty involved in butchering animals for food, to me there is almost always going to be some level of cruelty when you kill a living organism with something like a brain and some capacity for emotions.

For a guy I consider pretty smart, I dont know why he did such a simplistic and irrational analysis of the topic of animal cruelty.

Makes sense.

Sounds like a defensive posture as if to say of "don't judge me badly, I'm not bad, I'm a good person".

I've heard some meat-eaters do something similar with an "attack-first" defensive posture when they claim that "vegetarians kill far more animals". And then it just sounds stupid and they lose all personal credibility and also quite a bit of personal power.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?
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