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Infographics: sharing, previews, & feedack

I like the 3D effect in the first poster as well. Gives the feeling of fuzzy boundaries on top of the overlaps.

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

Going for a new infographic on social scalping dynamics.

Not the most complex concept, but not the easiest thing to put on pictures either.

This was the description I gave the designer:

  1. A manipulator hands a bag of money to a victim (gift)
  2. Manipulator talks (manipulates) to make the bag seem bigger
  3. Picture to show the manipulator's "credit" (maybe the bag itself) increasing above the actual value of his bag-gift, while the victim's "debt" also grows larger than what he received
  4. The difference between actual value of the gift and the extra credit earned, that is the "manipulation effect"

Very curious to see what comes out of this.

This is a case where the designer needs to:

  1. Understand the concept first
  2. Find a way to put it into pictures (I tried to partially do it for him above)

One can be a great technical designer, but a poor support to a business.

Designers who can conceptualize things, and turn them into easy-to-understand pictures, logos, videos, and infographics, are the ones who are most likely to advance to leadership positions in organizations -if they have a minimum of political acumen, that is-.
The ones who are good technically alone, they keep on doing the day-to-day work alone.

Keep you updated here, and happy to get feedback as well.

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

A sketch that came to mind:

Ali Scarlett has reacted to this post.
Ali Scarlett

Matthew, that's genius!

Did you use some online tool to do it?

 

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

Here's the first draft.

First off, there was a misunderstanding.

In my initial message, I linked to my original social scalping chart saying "it doesn't work well". And then provided instructions on how to go about a new chart.
Instead, the designer ignored the instructions for the new chart, and used my old chart.

One thing I learned in life:

If you can avoid long discussions, and explanations do.
They often lead nowhere.

So rather than explain the misunderstanding, I'll work on what he provided already as there is some value in it.
And then I'll probably try someone else for my original idea -you never know I'll find a reliable designer to stick with-:

The "looks" are alright, I think.

But the first 2 pictures are just random.

The third one is great because it conveys the concept.

But the first one doesn't convey deception, as it should -and as Matthew's picture does-.
And same for the second one: it doesn't convey the deceptive nature of denying someone's help.

SUGGESTIONS / IDEAS?

If you guys have any idea on how to better convey these concepts, happy to hear.

Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

I got a bunch of icons from Google Images & Freepik and photoshopped them together.

Maybe I should have used all the graphics from Freepik and other free-to-use graphics websites to be on the safe side of copyright.

Also, another icon for the 2 people shaking hands without the grey background would probably look better.

Here are the files:
Link to Icons & Photoshop File

I like to use Canva too.
It comes with graphics.

Lucio: One thing I learned in life:

If you can avoid long discussions, and explanations do.
They often lead nowhere.

Tell me about this :).

Lucio: And then I'll probably try someone else for my original idea -you never know I'll find a reliable designer to stick with-:

I think it's really challenging.
I heard the tech giants bought over entire design agencies to get access to high-quality designers.

COLOUR - I don't think blue suits

The colour blue seems to convey a sense of stability and loyalty.
Maybe orange, yellow or purple may convey the right tone.

Infographics

It feels a bit verbose and long.
Like a COVID-19 precaution poster.

I think a story format would suit better.
With various interactions along the way conveying social scalping manipulation.
For example, a day of a businessman or an employee.

Something like this poster of a typical startup's journey:

 

 

Lucio Buffalmano has reacted to this post.
Lucio Buffalmano

Thank you so much, Matthew!

That infographic example looks super awesome.

Unluckily, that would become a mini-project on its own, and can't give it that high priority right now.
That's one of the disadvantages of solopreneurship, I guess: you gotta cut on something that would otherwise be cool, had you had a team for it :).

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

*Note: My device is broken which may result in some wacky formatting in this post. Please excuse any formatting or grammatical errors you find below.

Lucio, I must say, it made me very upset to read that you took the time to provide the designer with instructions only for them to simply ignore them.

For me at least, it would feel unfair to my time and to my resources since graphic designers typically offer a limited amount of revisions before charging more for any additional ones.

That said, to be honest, your instructions confused me a bit as well.

Here was my train of thought when I first read your instructions:

  1. A manipulator hands a bag of money to a victim (gift) (= a small change, but better might have been to put the word "gift" right after bag of money)
  2. Manipulator talks (manipulates) to make the bag seem bigger (= OK, so I can either make two different pictures or one with illustrations emphasizing the growth of the bag. Which one does Lucio want?)
  3. Picture to show the manipulator's "credit" (maybe the bag itself) increasing above the actual value of his bag-gift, while the victim's "debt" also grows larger than what he received (= wait, what is this about credit and debt now? How does Lucio want me to illustrate all of this in one drawing? Does he expect me to?)
  4. The difference between actual value of the gift and the extra credit earned, that is the "manipulation effect" (= is this a note for me or does he want me to write "manipulation effect" somewhere in the drawing? How am I supposed to do all of this?)

Now, my thoughts on your instructions are more than a little unfair. Professional graphic designers have (or should have) experience taking and following instructions to present high-quality work to their clients. Work that will satisfy their client to where it justifies accepting their hard-earned money in exchange for it.

So, these thoughts are more from looking at your instructions and practicing (what Chris Voss calls) forced empathy by thinking, "How am I supposed to do that?"

And, in the spirit of practicing that forced empathy, I did my best to answer that question myself by coming up with a quick design that you can use to give future graphic designers an idea of what you mean.

Opening this post up to everyone now, I designed this with a few things in mind:

  • This design if for instructional purposes for graphic designers only: a means to achieving a better finished product from a reliable professional
  • The Feynman Technique is necessary for ease of explanation when it comes to discussing advanced social strategy: respectfully explaining the social exchange manipulation concepts the same way you would a third-grader can reduce future misunderstandings
  • Illustrating all of the possible social exchange manipulations in only one infographic might be unrealistic: pulling from Matthew's latter post in this thread, it might be better to create four separate infographics and connect them together (you'll see what I mean by that later in this post)

 

 

As you'll notice, there's a note that says, "If you accept the gift without credit-erasing or debt-erasing (see below)…," which is where Lucio could attach the next relevant infographic to the end of this "credit-inflating" one.

Something I did not illustrate in that initial graphic is also the opportunity to list the alternative forms of social exchange manipulation (in this case, other ways that credit-inflating can appear):

 

This only took me about 15 or so minutes to cook up. So, hopefully this means that this isn't as big a project as we might think.

I used the exact same colors the other designer used to better highlight some of the differences which could help underline where both designs have room to improve.

A couple of areas where I think my design could improve:

  • Lack of expertise (= I still consider myself a beginner and, as a result, may have misconstrued some of the information in the infographic above)
  • Mitigating the cons of oversimplification (= the infographic is only for explanatory purposes. Yet, the oversimplification needed to explain this to someone completely unfamiliar with power dynamics may result in their presentation of misinformation—think "pop science")

A big thank you to Matthew for your idea on making it more of a "step-by-step type" infographic. Much more simple to design in my opinion and could reduce more of the confusion involved with the project.

*Note: Main tool used here was Canva. Unluckily, I'm already noticing some issues in my post after having switched devices and I like to do my best to keep the quality of my posts high. So, I may stop posting until the technology on my side is sorted out.

Lucio Buffalmano and Matthew Whitewood have reacted to this post.
Lucio BuffalmanoMatthew Whitewood

Ali, man, this is also genius, thank you so much!

As for my notes being confusing, I agree.
I suppose that I was hoping the designer would spend some time trying to understand what we're trying to convey with the design.

There are two ways to look at this, that overlap with important mindsets and life-approaches:

FROM DESIGNER'S SELF-DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE

What we're discussing here boils down to self-development.

From my point of view of looking at the world, it's all wanting to do a good job, or being happy to remain a monkey on a typewriter.

That might sound offensive, but it's for "kick in the butt" effect.
If you limited yourself to do what your tech-executioner level job demands of you, you'll always remain a monkey on a typewriter.

Of course, your personal returns will vary depending on the difficulty of the tech-thing you're doing.
If the technical execution is very difficult, then the entry barriers are high, and your job market value will be high (yes, new concept, there's such a thing as "job market value" :).

But you'll never go to the next level if you stop at the tech-execution level, no matter how skilled you might be.

And in this case, what Matthew and then what Ali 10x showed me, is that the tech skills are also quite achievable from non-professional.
So the added value of tech skills here is rather limited.

FROM TPM EFFECTIVENESS PERSPECTIVE

Of course, all of that is from the designer's perspective.

From TPM perspective, if the goal was to get this infographic done ASAP, it was simply naive and ineffective to believe or hope that the designer was willing to put the added value of a thinking brain behind his tech work.

On the other hand, since I'm still looking for a designer to stick with, these can all be effective ways of screening for a good designer.

A shit-test, in a way.

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?

This is what the designer came up with:

He missed the instruction that the man running should be on "debt erasing".

But he came up with a better horizontal version.

I now sent a further batch of revisions also based on your feedback guys.

Matthew Whitewood has reacted to this post.
Matthew Whitewood
Have you read the forum guidelines for effective communication already?
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