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What books would you like to see TPM review next?

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Right now, I'm looking at building my vocabulary to speak more eloquently (as Lucio recommends in his How to Be Charismatic article) by visiting Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day daily and then using it in a sentence at least once that day.

However, when I get the time, I'd like to test out reading a few vocab builder books and see the results:

  • The Well-Spoken Thesaurus: The Most Powerful Ways to Say Everyday Words and Phrases: looks like a way to start sounding smarter by changing how you say things, not so much what you say (which can be sort of a shortcut to sounding smarter faster, although, ideally you'd actually expand your vocabulary at some point).
  • The Vocabulary Builder Workbook: Simple Lessons and Activities to Teach Yourself Over 1,400 Must-Know Words: 5,414 ratings with close to 5 stars, I'm curious what the results will be after completing this book's lessons and activities.
  • Word Power Made Easy: The Complete Handbook for Building a Superior Vocabulary: from the reviews, this book seems to spend a little too much time making the case that expanding your vocabulary will make you richer (with studies that on the surface back his point, but fall apart after further analysis). Still, with 17,753 ratings and nearly 5 stars as well, it still seems like it could be worth the read.
  • Merriam-Webster's Vocabulary Builder: of course, this one made the list 🙂
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Lucio Buffalmano

A couple of social skills books by Patrick King that I'm interested in from his "How to be More Likable and Charismatic" book series:

  • Better Small Talk: Talk to Anyone, Avoid Awkwardness, Generate Deep Conversations, and Make Real Friends 
  • The Art of Witty Banter: Be Clever, Quick, & Magnetic (2nd Edition)
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Thank you for sharing this, Ali!

Of course, do let us know if you follow through and find any gems -or anything useful, really-.

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Ali Scarlett
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Hello!

There are many amazing books reviewed, both in the forums and in the main site, but these are some of my personal old favorites that i don't know if you guys had the pleasure of learning about:

  • The elephant in the brain by Robin Hanson
  • Unlocking the emotional brain
  • How To Have Impossible Conversations
  • Rules for Radicals: A Practical Primer for Realistic Radicals, by Saul Alinsky
  • Dead or Alive: The Choice Is Yours, by Geoff Thompson
  • The Book of Five Rings, by Miyamoto Musashi
  • Escape from Evil
  • Influencer, by Kerry Patterson et al.
  • Talent is Overrated, by Geoff Colvin
  • How an Economy Grows and Why It Crashes, by Peter and Andrew Schiff
  • Making people talk Barry J Farber

Also, if these get integrated and added as sources to the Power University Resources, i believe I can sell it to specific subcultures I am a part of as a "Properly sourced" course

And yes, it's politics, they want to see their tribe acknowledged, marketing is like that. I want to help them get over it, but this would help

E ( X ) = μ = ∑ x P ( x )
Quote from Grigorio on October 24, 2022, 6:42 pm

Hello!

There are many amazing books reviewed, both in the forums and in the main site, but these are some of my personal old favorites that i don't know if you guys had the pleasure of learning about:

  • The elephant in the brain by Robin Hanson
  • Unlocking the emotional brain
  • How To Have Impossible Conversations
  • Rules for Radicals: A Practical Primer for Realistic Radicals, by Saul Alinsky
  • Dead or Alive: The Choice Is Yours, by Geoff Thompson
  • The Book of Five Rings, by Miyamoto Musashi
  • Escape from Evil
  • Influencer, by Kerry Patterson et al.
  • Talent is Overrated, by Geoff Colvin
  • How an Economy Grows and Why It Crashes, by Peter and Andrew Schiff
  • Making people talk Barry J Farber

Thank you for the tips man!

Some notes on some of them:

  • Rules for Radicals I recently finished. Quite good (and review coming soon)
  • The Book of Five Rings, a huge classic, but I stopped it with the idea of coming back to it later on. Call me a heretic, but a some of the classics, in my humble opinion, cannot hold a candle to their more modern counterparts
  • How To Have Impossible Conversations recently finished Boghossian's other book "A Manual For Creating Atheists". Wouldn't necessarily agree with the goal, but otherwise, quite good (and review also coming)
Quote from Grigorio on October 24, 2022, 6:42 pm

if these get integrated and added as sources to the Power University Resources, i believe I can sell it to specific subcultures I am a part of as a "Properly sourced" course

I respectfully disagree on this.

If a subculture can't see PU as "properly sourced" with the already thousands of studies, books, and resources that are into it, then I call on this a "jump this other hoop till you're dead (cause I'll never be convinced)" type of game.

And the only way to handle those games, is to never even take the first jump :).

P.S.:
@grigorio moved your post here to avoid same(or similar)-topic proliferation.

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Was organizing my Amazon Wishlists and thought it made sense to move my book lists here.

Booklist #1 is made up of two books recommended by connections of mine:

  • The Purpose Driven Life: What on Earth Am I Here For?: good ratings, good achievements (NYT bestseller), and I'm hoping for good content inside. It seems to be geared towards Christians, but it's also described as "designed to be read in 42 days, each chapter providing a daily meditation and practical steps to help you discover and live out your purpose." So, here's to hoping there are some good takeaways and exercises for Ultimate Power 🙂
  • Profit First: Transform Your Business from a Cash-Eating Monster to a Money-Making Machine: highly recommended side-by-side with The E-Myth Revisited by an old contact of mine. Given that the latter book made TPM's best entrepreneurship resources list, I'm hoping this one is just as good, if not better.

Booklist #2 was created out of frustration from watching a fictional character I'd grown to love shoot herself in the foot repeatedly because she didn't know her rights and misnavigated the law and legal system after taking a risk to help herself and community.

For now, in search of a solid overview, these are the books on my list:

  • The Know Your Bill of Rights Book: Don't Lose Your Constitutional Rights--Learn Them!: to know one's rights (albeit, I'm not yet fully sold on this one)
  • The Tools of Argument: How the Best Lawyers Think, Argue, and Win: to fight battles in and outside of court (and, ideally, win 🙂 )

I think knowing the law also grants an extent of personal empowerment since one's freedom is limited by the law and, with at least a foundational legal understanding, one can know where that line (limit) is and maximize their life up to that line if they so choose.

P.S.:

Bel, if you're reading this and know of a good book to add to that last list, I'd be happy to hear your thoughts on any you thought were good.

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Thank you for this, Ali!

The Purpose Driven Life was reviewed in here before the "OK book summaries purge" (something I'm partially undoing now by republishing several summaries, BTW, following the three-pronged approach "popular/really good/really bad to be warned against policy).

It was good, don't remember anything earth-shattering, but may be worth a listen (I'd listen to it rather than reading it since the concepts are simple enough that one single fast-rate listen should be enough).

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Quote from Ali Scarlett on November 4, 2022, 1:28 am

Booklist #2 was created out of frustration from watching a fictional character I'd grown to love shoot herself in the foot repeatedly because she didn't know her rights and misnavigated the law and legal system after taking a risk to help herself and community.

For now, in search of a solid overview, these are the books on my list:

  • The Know Your Bill of Rights Book: Don't Lose Your Constitutional Rights--Learn Them!: to know one's rights (albeit, I'm not yet fully sold on this one)
  • The Tools of Argument: How the Best Lawyers Think, Argue, and Win: to fight battles in and outside of court (and, ideally, win 🙂 )

I think knowing the law also grants an extent of personal empowerment since one's freedom is limited by the law and, with at least a foundational legal understanding, one can know where that line (limit) is and maximize their life up to that line if they so choose.

P.S.:

Bel, if you're reading this and know of a good book to add to that last list, I'd be happy to hear your thoughts on any you thought were good.

Hey Ali,

most of my book readings on lawyering are about the "inside job" rather than the "outside perspective". As such, they deal with many issues that pertain to lawyers as professionals (including client relationship topics).

That said, the best book I read on the topic of the "general professional skills" of a lawyer, that I thoroughly recommend and that, I think, can be useful even from the outside, is:

  • Essential Lawyering Skills, by Stefan H. Krieger and Richard K. Neumann, Jr.

This is truly top notch.

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Quote from Ali Scarlett on November 4, 2022, 1:28 am
  • The Know Your Bill of Rights Book: Don't Lose Your Constitutional Rights--Learn Them!: to know one's rights (albeit, I'm not yet fully sold on this one)

Yep, very good one, to at least know the main ones.

Also it's good CYA in case you meet an asshole of a cop.

Generally speaking though, I think getting too deep may not be the best use of one's time since the details change as soon as you cross state/country, and because the general skills to deal with people also cover most encounters with the police.

An early article on TPM was on "how to avoid traffic tickets", and to this date, just by playing my cards right and respecting the officers, I never got a ticket that covered the full extent of the infraction (either got a ticket for something smaller, or nothing).

There is a subculture on the Internet indeed that look at their rights as the background to antagonize and fight with the officers, and a bunch of people who support that attitude.

Just as an example:

Guy: (yelling to the police) "Because I like fucking with you guys"

This guy may "know his rights", but chances are high he'd have walked off a lot sooner, without annoying and upsetting anyone -including himself-, just by being kinder -or just more "normal", really- and actually talking and explaining to the officers -and without even needing to invoke his rights-.

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Quote from Lucio Buffalmano on November 6, 2022, 3:12 am

(...)

Generally speaking though, I think getting too deep may not be the best use of one's time since the details change as soon as you cross state/country, and because the general skills to deal with people also cover most encounters with the police.

(...)

Agreed, Lucio, thanks for your input (and for pointing to that awesome article :).

  • Power Moves: How Women Can Pivot, Reboot, and Build a Career of Purpose: I'm really only curious about this book for its title, its "Relationships Matter" section, and her section titled "Part II":

When I saw "The Power Moves Approach", I smiled :).

I doubt there will be a direct reference to Lucio, but it will be fun to see what she has to say on the topic of power moves and power dynamics.

The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence is a book I was looking at but, upon reading the reviews, decided to let go.

It caught my eye that the author gives 12 power principles (which are supposed to serve as his "fundamental laws of power"). But, those principles seem to be lacking:

So, I'll probably skip this one.

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